Research

Skills Trades Employment in the Pipeline Industry: 2006-2015
Pipelines are important to the efficient operation of the U.S. economy, and pipeline construction is an important source of family supporting jobs for construction workers. What then are the economic and job impacts of pipeline construction for the construction trades? This report reviews pipeline jobs data from two principal sources.

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Apprenticeships in England: impoverished but laddered
Current discussion among federal policy makers regarding the expansion of the U.S. apprenticeship system draws on the example of apprenticeship expansion in England. Often, this does not reflect a clear understanding of the current English Apprenticeship system. This paper aims to inform federal and state administrative policy makers and legislators, program administrators, and the staff of training and apprenticeship organizations who are interested in understanding the features and performance of the current English system. This paper describes the English apprenticeship system and summarizes current research on the outcomes of that system.

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Study of Construction Employment in Marcellus Shale Related Oil and Gas Industry
The purpose of this study was to retrospectively determine the number of full-time equivalent construction jobs created from 2008 through 2013 on natural gas pipeline projects as part of the Marcellus Shale formation in West Virginia, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Ohio.

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Prevailing Wage Laws: What Do We Know?
In recent years, states and municipalities have been increasingly engaged in heated, often partisan, debates over the future of prevailing wage laws. In addition to the repeal of state prevailing wage laws in West Virginia and Kentucky, there have been high-profile political challenges in several states including Wisconsin and Nevada. Numerous city councils and county commissioners have been concurrently engaged in similar debates regarding local prevailing wage ordinances. References to economic studies often accompany these calls for legislative action, as advocates on both sides of the debate can point to papers supporting their position. The lack of consensus among researchers, however, is mostly attributable to differences in empirical methodology and scientific rigor. To improve the clarity of future public policy debates on prevailing wage laws, this paper summarizes the current state of research on these policies, highlighting recent academic findings and identifying empirical shortcomings inherent in a number of oft-cited non-academic studies.

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